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National Archaeological Museum Skip-the-Line Entrance Tickets

National Archaeological Museum Skip-the-Line Entrance Tickets

€8
Free Cancellation
Extended Validity
Instant Confirmation
Mobile Ticket
Flexible Duration
  • Visit one of the greatest museums with the largest collection of Greek antiquity.
  • Skip the snaking queues to enter this 19th-century museum and admire the iconic artifacts such as the statues of Zeus and Poseidon.
  • Enjoy access to famous objects of the past such as the Gold Deathmask of Agamemnon, the Antikythera mechanism, and more.
  • You are free to explore the museum and marvel at the artifacts at your own pace.
  • Tip: Take a break from exploring the museum whenever you want in the unique inner garden cafe area.
  • Please bring along your passport or a government ID.
  • You can cancel these tickets up to 24 hours before the experience begins and get a full refund.
  • These tickets are valid until 31 March, 2023.

Visiting the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, Best Known for its Collection of Ancient Greek Antiquities

The National Archaeological Museum in Athens was the first museum to be established in the country after liberation from the Ottomans. It boasts an abundant repository of ancient Greek antiquities, including Egyptian and Eastern metalworks and ceramic art, and Neolithic, Mycenean, and Cyclidic sculptures. The permanent collections house more than 11,000 exhibits, with the temporary collections, brought in from time to time. The museum gives you a panoramic view of Greek’s social and political scenario through art and sculptures from prehistory to late antiquity. Read on to know more about the National Archaeological Museum in Athens, how to book National Archaeological Museum tickets, their opening hours, and other information to help you plan your visit. 

Why Visit the National Archaeological Museum in Athens?

Why Visit the National Archaeological Museum in Athens
  • Largest Collection of Ancient Greek Artifacts: The Archaeological Museum in Athens contains ancient Greek artifacts like bronze statues of Artemision Zeus, the Greek God Poseidon, and the Antikythera mechanism used to make scientific astronomical calculations.
  • Explore the Oldest Archaeological Library: The museum’s library is a treasure trove of more than 20,000 books related to art, archaeology, ancient philosophy, and Greek and Latin literature. The Archaeological Museum also houses excavation records and archival materials from the 19th and 20th centuries. 
  • Enjoy a Collection of Metalworks: When exploring the Archaeological Museum, make sure to look at the treasures of the Mycenae goldsmiths, the Cycladic statues, funerary columns, vases with intricate designs like geometric patterns and white-ground lekythoi. 
  • Explore the Egyptian and Eastern Antiques: The National Archaeological Museum also features works from ancient Egyptian and Eastern civilizations, dating from the pre-war period (5400 to 3000 BC) and the Roman period (30 BC to 395 AD). 
  • Look at the Interactive Displays: The museum authorities have set up interactive perfume displays that smell like wine. The Myceneans preferred wine to beer and it was a symbol of wealth and prestige back in the day.

Your National Archaeological Museum Tickets Explained

National Archaeological Museum Skip the Line Entrance Tickets

What is the Best Way to Book National Archaeological Museum Tickets? Book Online!

The National Archaeological Museum not only contains the largest collection of ancient Greek art and sculptures but also provides interactive displays and context to make your experience informative and memorable. Make sure to book your tickets well in advance for the National Archaeological Museum in Athens attracts attention throughout the year, especially from September through October. 

  • Convenience: One of the best perks of booking tickets online is that you do not have to wait in long lines. You can do so with the click of a button with ease. 
  • Secure Bookings: Online ticket bookings ensure that you do not miss your attraction and get guaranteed access upon payment confirmation. 
  • Great Deals: If you book tickets online, you may chance upon combo offers and discounted prices.

National Archaeological Museum Highlights

Epinetra of Aphrodite in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Epinetra of Aphrodite

The clay artifact dates between 430 BC to 420 BC and would have served as a wedding present back in the day. It was shaped as a half-cylinder to be worn on the thighs of women when they were weaving wool for weaving. The strong association between wool-working and the ideal Grecian wife was popularized as a wedding present. 

Gold Death Mask of Agamemnon in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Gold Death Mask of Agamemnon

The Gold Mask of Agamemnon is believed to have been the corpse covering of an important king in ancient Greece. It is one of the five masks discovered in Mycenae. The mask is considered to be older than the 16th century BC. The mask covering the dead’s face suggests a resemblance to the ancient Egyptian pharaohs. 

The Varvakeios Athena in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

The Varvakeios Athena

One of the most important sculptures within the museum, the Varvakeios Athena is an almost accurate replica of the gold and ivory statue of Athena the Virgin, which once stood on the walls of the Parthenon. The statue is only one-twelfth of the original size, made from Pentelic marble and traces of red and yellow paint. 

Artemision Bronze in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Artemision Bronze

The bronze statue of Zeus or Poseidon is one of the most important shrouded mysteries in the National Archaeological Museum. Although there is much confusion regarding whether the man yields a thunderbolt or a trident in his hand, the posture of the statue is an incredible specimen of the Severe style of the Classical period. 

Marble Statues of Kouros and Kroisos in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Marble Statues of Kouros and Kroisos

Observe the series of several kouroi (youths) and korai (maidens) statues to understand how Greece emerged as powerful city-states in the Golden Age. The statues were additions to important figures' funerary services. You can tell the ages apart, for the Golden Age sculptors perfected depicting people in motion. 

The Jockey of Artemision in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

The Jockey of Artemision

The one-of-a-kind Hellenistic statue of a young African boy riding a horse cuts a stunning picture in the National Archaeological Museum. The bronze statue dates back to 140 BC, features as a centerpiece in the museum, and also possesses the branded image of the Goddess Nike on its flank. 

Portrait Head of Emperor Hadrian in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Portrait Head of Emperor Hadrian

The Roman Emperor Hadrian held a deep admiration for the Greek culture and way of life and sought to integrate it into his legacy. The portrait head is a part of his enduring legacy. Hadrian had declared Athens to be the cultural capital of ancient Greece and built many magnificent temples, with some of them existing even today. 

Mycenean Warrior Vase in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Mycenean Warrior Vase

The Mycenean vase is probably the best-known remnant of Helladic pottery and dates back to the 12th century BCE. The vase served as a krater, a bowl used to mix water and wine. The outside of the vase shows painted warriors, decked in helmets, shields, and breastplates, on their way to march to glory. 

The Antikythera Mechanism in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

The Antikythera Mechanism

The Antikythera Mechanism is probably the first known evidence of an analog computer, that assisted ancient Greeks in calculating the movements of the sun and the moon. With a complex system of 30 interlocking gears, the Antikythera device made scientific calculations and predicted the dates of the Olympian games. 

Bronze Statue of Emperor Augustus in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Bronze Statue of Emperor Augustus

The bronze statue of Emperor Augustus was found between the two islands of Euboea and Hagios Eustratios. The iconographic features of Prima Porta and Actium are evident in its structure, with his right hand raised in an official greeting, while his left hand grips the horse’s reign and sword. 

The Boxers Fresco in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

The Boxers Fresco

A part of the Thera collection, the Boxers Fresco depicts two naked boys, wearing gloves and belts engaged in a fight. The painting is depicted in vibrant shades and dates back to the 16th century BCE. The boys probably descend from the Minoan civilization, which once occupied the Aegean lands. 

Tombs of the Kerameikos in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Tombs of the Kerameikos

The Kerameikos skeletons were found in an exceptionally good state in an excavation venture in central Athens in 1891. The two skeletons were covered in a fine layer of mud and surrounded by 9 vases that were customary funeral offerings in 460 BC in ancient Greece.

Marble Sculpture of the God of the Sea in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

Marble Sculpture of the God of the Sea

The Parian marble sculpture of the Greek God Poseidon was discovered off the coast of Melos in 1877. The sculpture is supposed to be as old as circa 125 BC to 100 BC. Poseidon is depicted nearly nude, with his signature trident and right leg supported by a dolphin. 

The Nester’s Cup in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

The Nester’s Cup

The Nestor’s Cup is a dove cup, with two handles styled like birds. The birds were later identified to be falcons that adorn the legendary cup of Nestor in the Illiad. The cup is presumed to have been designed by a Greek craftsman adapting to the Cretan design.

The Marble Statue of a Sphinx in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens

The Marble Statue of a Sphinx

The sphinx in Greek mythology refers to a ferocious female monster, like in Sophocles’ drama Oedipus Rex. The one showcased in the museum was likely an addition to some important figures’ funeral services. The sculpture dates back to circa 570 BCE to 550 BCE. 

Plan Your Visit to the National Archaeological Museum

Timings
Getting There
Facilities
Nearby
Visitor Tips
National Archaeological Museum Timings
  • 1 November to 31 March
    Tuesday: 1 PM to 8 PM
    Wednesday to Monday: 08:30 AM to 03:30 PM
  • 1 April to 31 October
    Tuesday: 1 PM to 8 PM
    Wednesday to Monday: 8 AM to 8 PM

Closed on: 25 and 26 December, 1 January, 25 March, Orthodox Easter Sunday, and 1 May

Note: Must carry identity proof like a passport or government ID 

Duration: at least 3 hours

Best Time to Visit: September to October

How to Reach the National Archaeological Museum in Athens

Address: Patision 44, Athens 106 82, Greece

Find on Maps

  • By Metro: Green Line
    Nearest Stop: Omonia or Victoria
  • By Bus: Β5, Α6, Β6, Ε6, Α7, Β7, Ε7, Α8, Β8, Α12, Β12, Γ12, Ε12, 022, 035, 046, 060, 200, 224, 605, 608, and 622
    Nearest Stop: Sounio
  • By Trolley: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, and 14
    Nearest Stop: Patision Street
Facilities Available at the National Archaeological Museum
  • Accessibility: Almost every museum in Athens provides excellent handicapped support. The National Archaeological Museum is no exception, with a wheelchair-accessible ramp on the northern side of the building on Heraklios Emperor Road. It connects to the first floor, with a nearby elevator to reach the accessible washroom at the garden cafe. 
  • Photography: You can click pictures without the flash feature inside the National Archaeological Museum.
  • Library: The National Archaeological Museum has a huge collection of books dedicated to ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, their language, ancient philosophy, art, and archaeology.
  • Garden Cafe: The museum has a modern coffee shop tucked away amidst lush greenery. 
  • Gift Shop: The museum’s ground floor offers an extensive collection of ceramics, silk scarves, jewelry, and personal goods. 
Attractions Near National Archaeological Museum in Athens
  • Delphi Archaeological Museum: The Delphi Archaeological Museum is a part of the ancient Delphi ruins, declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It houses the shrine of the Greek God Apollo. It is believed that Priestess Pythia communicated future outcomes from Delphi’s Oracle to the emissaries. 
  • Acropolis Museum: The Acropolis Museum is situated on top of the ancient archaeological site and houses a plethora of amazing exhibits. The Archaic Gallery and Parthenon Gallery are two of the most important highlights of this famous museum.
  • Temple of Poseidon: Dedicated to the Greek God of the Sea, the Temple of Poseidon is situated in Cape Sounion. The temple was mostly frequented by sailors and travelers, who wanted to escape the wrath of Poseidon and wanted to herald their ships to safety.
  • Temple of Zeus: Built to honor Theseus, the father of all Olympian Gods, the Temple of Zeus was erected around 470 BC. The sheer grandeur of its structure speaks volumes of the kind of power he held in ancient Greek mythology. 
Tips to Note When Visiting the National Archaeological Museum
  • Wear Comfortable Shoes: There are five permanent collections, along with some temporary ones always on display at the National Archaeological Museum. Wear your most comfortable, closed shoes, for you will need at least 3 to 4 hours to explore the artifacts properly. 
  • Carry Identity Proof: You need to bring identity proof like a passport or a government-issued ID to enter the museum.
  • Do some Prior Research: The museum authorities position the artifacts in a way that you would be able to understand the context. However, if you read up on some of your favorite Greek mythological characters, you will be able to understand the relevance of the artifacts even better. 
  • Visit the Gardens: The Archaeological Museum has a lush-green garden with a modern coffee shop tucked away.
  • Book Tickets Online: The National Archaeological Museum attracts attention throughout the year. Try to book tickets online and in advance to secure your spots. 

Frequently Asked Questions About the National Archaeological Museum Answered

Q. What is the best way to buy National Archaeological Museum tickets?

A. The best way to secure National Archaeological Museum tickets is to purchase them online. Online ticket bookings are easy and convenient and ensure that you do not miss out on visiting the attractions on a crowded day. 

Q. Can I buy National Archaeological Museum tickets online?

A. Yes, it is best to buy National Archaeological Museum tickets online, for you do not have to stand in long queues and can secure seats in advance. 

Q. How to get discounts on National Archaeological Museum tickets?

A. If you book National Archaeological Museum tickets online, you may chance upon exclusive discounts and combo offers. 

Q. What do I need to carry inside the National Archaeological Museum tickets?

A. You must carry identity proof like a passport or government-issued ID to enter the National Archaeological Museum.

Q. When does the National Archaeological Museum open?

A. The National Archaeological Museum opens from 1 PM to 8 PM on Tuesdays and 08:30 AM to 03:30 PM on Wednesdays to Mondays from 1st November to 31st March. And, the Museum opens from 1 PM to 8 PM on Tuesdays and from 8 AM to 8 PM on Wednesdays to Mondays from 1st April to 31st October.

Q. How much time to spend at the National Archaeological Museum in Athens?

A. You need to spend at least 3 to 4 hours inside the National Archaeological Museum to explore the artifacts properly. 

Q. What is the address of the National Archaeological Museum in Athens?

A. The National Archaeological Museum is situated on Patision 44, Athens 106 82 in Greece.

Q. How big is the National Archaeological Museum in Athens?

A. The National Archaeological Museum in Athens is known for housing the largest collection of Greek antiquity in the world. The artifacts are stored inside a neo-classical building and spread over 8000 square meters. There are more than 11,000 exhibits in the National Archaeological Museum. The museum has five permanent collections, with temporary ones displayed now and then. You would need at least 3 hours to look at every artifact displayed in the rooms. 

Q. What is the best way to reach the National Archaeological Museum?

A. The best way to reach the National Archaeological Museum is to get on a metro from the Green line and get off at Victoria or Omonia. The museum is a short walk from there. 

Q. Does the National Archaeological Museum have an entrance fee?

A. Yes, you need to book a ticket to enter the National Archaeological Museum.

Q. What can be found at the National Archaeological Museum?

A. The Gold Mask of Agamemnon, the bronze statue of either Zeus or Poseidon, the marble statue of Emperor Augustus, the statue of a Sphinx, the Nestor’s Cup, and the Antikythera mechanism are some ancient artifacts that are housed in the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

Q. Is the National Archaeological Museum worth visiting?

A. The  National Archaeological Museum has the largest collection of ancient Greek antiquities in the world. The extensive collection surpassed geographical boundaries, and now also contains ancient Egyptian and Eastern marvels. You can also find tons of Neolithic Mycenean, and Cyclidic ceramic statues and metalworks inside the museum.  

Q. Can I click pictures in the National Archaeological Museum?

A. You can click pictures inside the National Archaeological Museum, however, flash photography is not allowed on the premises. 

Q. Is the National Archaeological Museum wheelchair accessible?

A. The National Archaeological Museum is equipped to assist visitors in wheelchairs or with limited mobility. It has a ramp that connects to the first floor on the northern side of the building on Heraklios Emperor Road. 

Q. Can I buy souvenirs from the National Archaeological Museum?

A. The National Archaeological Museum has an extensive collection of silk scarves, personal jewelry, ceramic plates, and other trinkets on its ground floor. 

Q. Can I cancel my National Archaeological Museum tickets?

A. If you book National Archaeological Museum tickets online, you can cancel your tickets up to 24 hours before the experience begins and get a full refund on your purchase. 

Q. What are some of the attractions near the National Archaeological Museum?

A. If you are planning a full-day trip, you can visit the Delphi Archaeological Museum, the Acropolis Museum, the Temple of Poseidon, and the Temple of Greece, along with the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.